RalaPure - R-Alpha Lipoic Acid
RalaPure R-Alpha Lipoic Acid
Two-Faced Lipoic Acid
The Evil Twin
Mirror, Mirror
What Researchers Say
The Bottom Line

Glucose Metabolism
Transit Strike
Deadly Resistance
The Sugar Struggle
The Bottom Line

Antioxidant Activity
Antioxidant Antagonist
The Bottom Line

Neurological Function
Blood and Iron
The Bottom Line

The Mitochondrion
Turbo Charger
Energy in Crisis
Youthful Spring
Leadfoot Problem
The Bottom Line

Fundamental Aging
Research
Free Radical Theory
Anti-Aging Therapy
Elixir of Life
Experiment Highlights
The Bottom Line

Independent Lab Test
References
How To Order RalaPure
RalaPure - R-Alpha Lipoic Acid

Transit Strike
Think of an old car starter whose pins have been so worn down by years of friction against the key's teeth that you have to juggle and twist at the key to get the car to start. When the same thing happens to your body's glucose transport system, your body becomes resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin is still being produced, but the cells no longer respond properly, and fail to mobilize GLUTs in response. As a result, cells don't take in glucose, and blood sugar levels climb.

Thus begins a vicious circle. Because high blood sugar is bad for you, the body responds to insulin resistance by producing more insulin. In the short term, this does the trick, forcing your cells to take in more glucose. But if insulin levels are persistently too high, your cells eventually become even less interested in hearing insulin's cries to take in excessive glucose, and respond by producing even less GLUTs which makes your cells even more insulin resistant.

Something has to give. If the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas just can't produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control in the face of increasing insulin resistance, then the cycle ends in adult-onset diabetes. On the other hand, if the brute-force strategy of keeping blood sugar levels at manageable levels by cranking insulin levels higher and higher succeeds, a metabolic disorder known as insulin resistance syndrome, or "Syndrome X" ensues. And while full-blown, clinical "Syndrome X" is not diagnosed in most people, almost everyone develops some degree of insulin resistance as part of the "normal" aging process.
Learn More About Deadly Resistance
How To Order RalaPure


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